Téada

“Raucous one minute, sensitive and serene the next…
this is traditional Irish music with attitude…
Something quite intangible separates téada from the rest,
and if there is a better new band on the Emerald Isle,
then they must be very, very good.”�

– Edinburgh Evening News (Scotland, Live review)

Since 2001, Téada has exploded onto the international touring circuit, capturing the imagination of many with a creative and spontaneous musical approach, seeking to capture the intricacies of Irish traditional art form within a contemporary band context. With two highly regarded album releases, Téada were quickly tipped by Irish World newspaper as “one of the most exciting traditional groups to emerge in recent years”. Voted “Best Traditional Newcomers” by readers of Irish Music Magazine in 2003, subsequent frequent headline performances at major music festivals throughout the US, Canada, Europe and Australia has seen the young lions of Irish music evolve into one of the most successful Irish touring acts worldwide with an established reputation for a knock-out live show.

Founded by Sligo fiddler Oisín Mac Diarmada, Téada first came together in 2001 to make an appearance on the innovative Irish television series Flosc. The young musicians shared a passion for a deeply traditional approach, and following an initial gig opening for the Sharon Shannon band at Dublin’s Celtic Flame festival in February 2001, Téada was off and running. A self-titled debut CD in 2002, Téada (GLCD1225), brought popular and critical raves, with The Irish Times applauding the band for “keeping the traditional flag flying at full mast.”

Most of the group’s members grew up in rural Ireland, learning traditional music through local classes and by listening to older musicians. “It was really a very organic process,” says Mac Diarmada. “With Téada, we wanted to capture some of that rawness and individuality of the solo artist within the dynamic of a full band.” Oisín, on fiddle, was joined in the band initially by John Blake on guitar and later flute, Seán McElwain from Monaghan on banjo and bouzouki, and Dubliner Tristan Rosenstock on bodhrán. Following a growing popularity, particularly in the US, which had seen the band becoming a full-time worldwide touring act by early 2003, the band sound was augmented greatly by the joining of Co. Laois accordion-player Paul Finn. The end of 2004 saw founding member John Blake depart the band for other pursuits as Sligo flutist Damien Stenson became the most recent addition to the line-up.

Téada’s fresh take on tradition continues to sound a chord. Their most recent CD “Give Us A Penny And Let Us Be Gone” on the Green Linnet label (GLCD1228) has garnered high praise. Irish Music Magazine calls it “one of the most deeply satisfying works to come our way in a long time.” “A priceless collection” adds the Irish Voice, and Sing Out says it’s “a smashing second release from the young lions of Irish music!” The future looks bright for this young band, whose fierce familiarity with the old ways makes for inventive music for a new generation.

Band Members
Oisin Mac Diarmada (fiddle)
Paul Finn (button accordion)
Damien Stenson (flute, whistle)
Seán McElwain (bouzouki, guitar)
Tristan Rosenstock (bodhrán – Irish frame drum)

For more information on Téada visit their website at http://www.teada.com